August | 2022 | Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis (2022)

The seasonal decline in Arctic sea ice extent from mid-July onward has proceeded at a near average pace. Extent is currently well below average, but above that observed for recent years. Extent is particularly low in the Laptev Sea sector, but ice extends to near the shore further east. Depending on weather conditions, the southern route through the Northwest Passage may become open. An area of low concentration ice persists over the central Arctic Ocean, extending to near the North Pole, and Antarctic ice extent is still at a record low.

Overview of conditions

Figure 1a. Arctic sea ice extent for August 1, 2022 was 6.99 million square kilometers (2.70 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that day. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Figure 1b. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of August 1, 2022, along with daily ice extent data for four previous years and the record low year. 2022 is shown in blue, 2021 in green, 2020 in orange, 2019 in brown, 2018 in magenta, and 2012 in dashed brown. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data. Sea Ice Index data.

(Video) NASA scientist: Arctic sea ice could disappear in 20 years

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Figure 1c. This figure shows ice motion vectors at 62.5-kilometer spatial resolution from July 19 to 21, 2022, based on passive and active microwave satellite data from the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facilities low-resolution sea ice drift product. Strong on-shore ice motion during the third week of July in part explains the persistence of sea ice in the East Siberian Sea.

Credit: European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facilities
High-resolution image

As of August 1, Arctic sea ice extent stood at 6.99 million square kilometers (2.70 million square miles) (Figure 1a). The decline rate of the extent through the second half of July was near the 1981 to 2010 average. Extent on August 1, while well below the 1981 to 2010 average, was the highest since 2014 and overall was twelfth lowest in the satellite record (Figure 1b). The average extent for the month of July as a whole was8.25 million square kilometers (3.19 million square miles), the twelfth lowest in the satellite record.

As previously reported in our mid-July post, a notable aspect of this summer so far is the substantial amount of open water along the Eurasia Coast in the Laptev Sea sector. However, by sharp contrast, ice is extensive further east in the East Siberian Sea, extending to near the shore. Strong on-shore ice motion during the third week of July in part explains the persistence of sea ice in this region (Figure 1c). Extent continues to be below average in the Barents Sea. The area of low concentration ice over the central Arctic Ocean extending to near the pole persists.

While Russia makes use of the Northern Sea route year-round, over the past decade, this coastal route has become nearly or completely ice-free in late summer. Given the extensive ice in the East Siberian Sea, it seems unlikely that this will be the case in 2022. By contrast, as assessed from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2(AMSR2) satellite data, the southern route through the Northwest Passage, known as Amundsen’s route, may open in the next few weeks, depending on weather conditions.

Conditions in context

Figure 2a. This plot shows average sea level pressure in the Arctic in millibars from July 15 to July 30, 2022. Yellows and reds indicate high air pressure; blues and purples indicate low pressure.

Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Laboratory
High-resolution image

(Video) Charctic Interactive Sea Ice Graph | Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis Video

Figure 2b. This plot shows the departure from average air temperature, relative to the 1981 to 2020 reference period, in the Arctic at the 925 hPa level, in degrees Celsius, from July 15 to July 30, 2022. Yellows and reds indicate higher than average temperatures; blues and purples indicate lower than average temperatures.

Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Laboratory
High-resolution image

The second half of July saw a shift in weather patterns. While the average sea level pressure pattern for the first half of the month featured a distinct area of low pressure centered over the central Arctic Ocean near the North Pole, the pattern for the second half of the month was one of high pressure (an anticyclone) centered north of the Laptev Sea, with low pressure centered near the Bering Strait between eastern Russia and Alaska (Figure 2a). This shift explains both the below average temperatures at the 925 mb level (about 2,500 feet above the surface) over the East Siberian Sea, where the implied winds between the high and low pressures have a component from the north, and the above average temperature north of the Barents Sea, where the implied winds on the eastern side of the anticyclone have an offshore component (Figure 2b).

(Video) Arctic Winter 2022 Sea Ice Found To Be 10Th-Lowest On Record

July 2022 compared to previous years

Figure 3. Monthly July ice extent for 1979 to 2022 shows a decline of 7.2 percent per decade.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Looking at the month as a whole, July sea ice extent declined by 2.42 million square kilometers (930,000 square miles), or at a rate of 78,100 square kilometers (30,200 square miles) per day, which was near the 1981 to 2010 average. This resulted in the average July extent ranking twelfth lowest in the satellite record. The downward linear trend in July sea ice extent over the 44-year-satellite record is 68,500 square kilometers (26,400 square miles) per year, or 7.2 percent per decade relative to the 1981 to 2010 average (Figure 3).

Antarctic sea ice

Figure 4. Antarctic sea ice extent for August 1, 2022 was 15.90 million square kilometers (6.14 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that day. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

(Video) Arctic Sea Ice Minimum: September 18, 2022

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

As of this report, Antarctic sea ice extent persists at record low levels, with regional low ice extent along the Weddell Sea at its northern ice edge, much of the East Antarctic coast, and the Bellingshausen Sea. The summer has been marked by a strong Amundsen Sea Low, which tends to drive warmer air from the northwest across the Peninsula and into the northern Weddell Sea. A high pressure tendency over Queen Maud Land is also acting to bring warm air from the north across the eastern end of the Weddell Sea ice cover. Overall, conditions on the continent and adjacent seas are far warmer than is typical, with regions near the Peninsula up to 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) above average for May through July, and temperatures in the Weddell Sea between 3 to 7 degrees Celsius (5 to 13 degrees Fahrenheit) above average. Above average temperatures extend across most of the continent and East Antarctic coast, where conditions are 1 to 4 degrees Celsius (2 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit) above average. Only the northern Ross Sea has significantly below average temperatures, of around 4 degrees Celsius (7 degrees Fahrenheit) below average.

A recent paper by our colleagues John Turner and others from British Antarctic Survey, along with co-authors from India and the U.S., looks at the conditions that led to the record low sea ice extent observed in February of this year. Overall, the authors attribute the low sea ice conditions to a combination of large-scale circulation patterns, including La Niña and a strong Amundsen Sea Low, and the impacts of severe regional storms moving ice away from the coast and into warmer waters and greater sunlight.

Effects of Arctic ozone depletion

Figure 5. This figure shows record low Arctic ozone concentrations observed on March 12, 2020.

Credit: NASA Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation system (DAS).
High-resolution image

While the Antarctic ozone hole that develops in austral spring is well known, stratospheric ozone depletion can also occur in the Arctic, though to a lesser extent. A recent study by Marina Friedel and colleagues, based on both observations and models, finds that springtime stratospheric ozone depletion over the Arctic is consistently followed by surface temperature and precipitation anomalies consistent with a positive Arctic Oscillation, an atmospheric pattern known to have significant impacts on climate conditions over the parts of the Northern Hemisphere as well as the Arctic. The authors argue that this is because ozone depletion leads to a reduction in short-wave radiation absorption, causing persistent negative temperature anomalies in the lower stratosphere and a delayed break up of the stratospheric polar vortex. When the Arctic Oscillation is positive, sea level air pressure is lower than average over the North Pole and higher than average over the mid-latitudes. This pressure pattern helps to keep cold air in the Arctic and favors warmer temperatures over the mid-latitudes. In 2020, Arctic ozone concentrations reached a record low on March 12 of 205 Dobson Units (Figure 5) compared to an average value of 240 Dobson Units for this time of year. At the same time, the Arctic Oscillation index reached a record high positive value. As a result, central and northern Europe were exceptionally warm and dry in spring 2020, whereas wet and cold conditions prevailed in the Arctic.

Further reading

Friedel, M., G. Chiodo, A. Stenke, et al. 2022. Springtime arctic ozone depletion forces northern hemisphere climate anomalies. Nature Geoscience.doi:10.1038/s41561-022-00974-7.

(Video) When will Arctic sea ice disappear?

Lavergne, T., S. Eastwood, Z. Teffah, H. Schyberg, and L.-A. Breivik. 2010. Sea ice motion from low resolution satellite sensors: an alternative method and its validation in the Arctic.Journal of Geophysical Research.doi:10.1029/2009JC005958.

Turner, J., C. Holmes, T. Caton Harrison, T. Phillips, B. Jena, T. Reeves-Francois, R. Fogt, E. R. Thomas, C. C. Bajish. 2022. Record low Antarctic sea ice cover in February 2022. Geophysical Research Letters. doi:10.1029/2022GL098904.

FAQs

What is happening to sea ice? ›

We lose Arctic sea ice at a rate of almost 13% per decade, and over the past 30 years, the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has declined by a stunning 95%. If emissions continue to rise unchecked, the Arctic could be ice-free in the summer by 2040.

How much ice is left in the Arctic 2022? ›

The Arctic sea ice extent is approaching the annual minimum with a situation definitely not bad as in recent years. At the end of August 2022, almost five and a half million square kilometers of sea ice are still present in the Arctic ocean.

Why is summer sea ice important? ›

Sea ice also plays a fundamental role in polar ecosystems. When the ice melts in the summer, it releases nutrients into the water, stimulating the growth of phytoplankton, the center of the marine food web. As the ice melts, it exposes ocean water to sunlight, spurring photosynthesis in phytoplankton.

How does melting sea ice affect the economy? ›

permafrost and melting sea ice could cause up to $130 trillion worth of extra economic losses globally under current business-as-usual trajectory over the next three centuries. If global warming is limited to 1.5°C, the additional cost will be reduced to under $10 trillion.

How does sea ice affect global climate? ›

Sea Ice Helps Prevent Atmospheric Warming

In addition to keeping sunlight out, sea ice traps existing heat in the ocean, keeping it from warming the air above. “The ability of the ice to keep heat in the ocean depends not only on its extent, but also on its thickness,” Tilling said.

What is causing the sea ice to melt? ›

Specifically, since the industrial revolution, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions have raised temperatures, even higher in the poles, and as a result, glaciers are rapidly melting, calving off into the sea and retreating on land.

Is Arctic ice growing or shrinking? ›

Key Takeaway: Summer Arctic sea ice extent is shrinking by 12.6% per decade as a result of global warming. Arctic sea ice reaches its minimum extent (the area in which satellite sensors show individual pixels to be at least 15% covered in ice) each September.

Is Arctic ice increasing? ›

Claims circulating on social media saying that arctic sea ice is increasing and therefore climate change is not real present a misleading picture of the facts, experts consulted by Reuters said.

When was the last time the Arctic was ice free? ›

Summary: Recent mapping of a number of raised beach ridges on the north coast of Greenland suggests that the ice cover in the Arctic Ocean was greatly reduced some 6000-7000 years ago. The Arctic Ocean may have been periodically ice free.

What is the purpose of sea ice? ›

Sea ice plays an important role maintaining the Earth's energy balance while helping keep polar regions cool due to its ability to reflect more sunlight back to space. Sea ice also keeps air cool by forming an insulating barrier between the cold air above it and the warmer water below it.

What are the 3 types of sea ice? ›

It may rapidly form over wide areas of water. Brash Ice: Accumulation of floating ice made up of fragments not more than 2 m across, the wreckage of other forms of ice. Ice Cake: Any relatively flat piece of ice less than 20 m across. Floe: Any relatively flat piece of ice 20 m or more across.

Why do we need to save the ice? ›

Arctic ice affects life as we know it.

Without Arctic sea ice, the global climate will change dramatically, precipitating a new and much more challenging state for human development.

What will happen if all the ice melts? ›

If all the ice covering Antarctica , Greenland, and in mountain glaciers around the world were to melt, sea level would rise about 70 meters (230 feet). The ocean would cover all the coastal cities. And land area would shrink significantly. But many cities, such as Denver, would survive.

How does melting glaciers affect humans? ›

Scientists warn that glaciers will vanish from the mainland US within decades. And their rapid melting is dangerous to society and the natural systems we rely on. Sea level rise is perhaps the most serious impact. Coastal towns and cities face increasing storm surges and becoming permanently flooded.

Where on Earth is the majority of sea ice? ›

Much of the world's sea ice is enclosed within the polar ice packs in the Earth's polar regions: the Arctic ice pack of the Arctic Ocean and the Antarctic ice pack of the Southern Ocean.

What happens if North Pole melts? ›

Sea levels will be drastically affected.

As the Arctic's ice disappears, the rest of the world experiences global warming. As per Museum of Natural History, one of the most dangerous ways in which we would be affected by the Arctic melting is the rising of sea levels.

Is ice bad for the environment? ›

Yes, Ice melt can be bad for the environment. Although they have some upside uses for safety. These products typically come in solid form and are used to keep sidewalks and other walkways free of snow and ice during the winter months.

Will the Earth melt few years from now? ›

Four billion years from now, the increase in Earth's surface temperature will cause a runaway greenhouse effect, creating conditions more extreme than present-day Venus and heating Earth's surface enough to melt it. By that point, all life on Earth will be extinct.

What would happen if the ocean stopped moving? ›

If the currents were to stop completely, the average temperature of Europe would cool 5 to 10 degrees Celsius. There would also be impacts on fisheries and hurricanes in the region. The currents in the North Atlantic are part of a global pattern called thermohaline circulation, or the global ocean conveyor.

How long will it take for all the ice to melt? ›

There are more than five million cubic miles of ice on Earth, and some scientists say it would take more than 5,000 years to melt it all.

Are we in ice Age? ›

Like all the others, the most recent ice age brought a series of glacial advances and retreats. In fact, we are technically still in an ice age. We're just living out our lives during an interglacial.

How long will it take for the doomsday glacier to melt? ›

However, were the glacier to collapse, it could cause oceans to rise as much as 2 feet around the world, the outlet reported. Previous studies have said that could happen as soon as 2031.

Is the Arctic getting colder? ›

Both the Arctic (North Pole) and the Antarctic (South Pole) are cold because they don't get any direct sunlight. However, the South Pole is a lot colder than the North Pole.
...
Really cold, or really, really cold?
Time of yearAverage (mean) temperature
North PoleSouth Pole
Summer32° F (0° C)−18° F (−28.2° C)
1 more row

Is Arctic or Antarctic better? ›

In the battle for extremes, Antarctica takes the win here. It holds the coldest temperature record at -129F, and winds in the winter here can reach up to 200 miles per hour.

How long will Antarctica last? ›

In a 2016 study, a team showed that under the worst-case emissions scenario, nearly all the West Antarctic ice sheet could be lost within 500 years. By 2100 the region's melt could add an extra 2.5 feet to the world's oceans.

Is the ice sheet growing? ›

We often hear about polar ice melting due to global warming, but one Antarctic ice shelf has grown in the last 20 years, new research has found. Scientists say that changing wind and sea ice patterns have led the eastern Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet to expand since the start of the 21st century.

What is the warmest the Earth has ever been? ›

The current official highest registered air temperature on Earth is 56.7 °C (134.1 °F), recorded on 10 July 1913 at Furnace Creek Ranch, in Death Valley in the United States.

What is the coldest Earth has ever been? ›

Finding the coldest place

The lowest air temperature ever measured by a weather station, minus 89 degrees Celsius (minus 128 degrees Fahrenheit), was recorded there at Russia's Vostok Station in July 1983.

Why is there no ice at the North Pole on Google Earth? ›

Both Google Earth and Google Maps show “open ocean” north of Greenland, even though it's normally pretty icy up there. A commonly cited reason is that the Arctic ice cap is floating on open ocean; there's no land underneath that reaches sea level.

Why is ice important to humans? ›

Ice is also important for humans. It has a myriad of uses. Some of them unusual and some of them better known: beauty, preservation, well-being and health, among others. But if we are to highlight one, that is 'the importance of ice in organ transplantations'.

How sea ice is formed? ›

Sea ice is formed when ocean water is cooled below its freezing temperature of approximately -2°C or 29°F. Such ice extends on a seasonal basis over great areas of the ocean.

Why is sea ice shrinking? ›

As the ocean heats up, sea ice melts A newer discovery is that, even if sea ice area is the same year to year, sea ice thickness, or volume, is shrinking. This is because the warm water melts sea ice from underneath, a little bit more every year. So sea ice volume is shrinking too.

How thick is sea ice? ›

In the northern hemisphere, the thermodynamic equilibrium thickness is about 3 meters, whereas in the southern hemisphere, equilibrium thickness is between 1 and 2 meters. Sea ice that is thicker than the thermodynamic equilibrium thickness is a result of dynamic (motion-related) processes.

What temperature does sea ice freeze? ›

Ocean water freezes at a lower temperature than freshwater.

Fresh water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit but seawater freezes at about 28.4 degrees Fahrenheit , because of the salt in it.

How much of Earth does sea ice cover? ›

In total, sea ice covers about 25 million square kilometers (9.7 million square miles) of Earth, or about two-and-a-half times the area of Canada. This equates to roughly 15 percent of the world's oceans being covered by sea ice during at least part of the year.

How can we save sea ice? ›

3 ways you can save the Arctic ice
  1. Pay more attention. What we measure, we value. Research shows that the things we monitor, we care more about and try to adapt our behaviour. ...
  2. Demand action. Watching the ice melt more closely won't make it melt any slower on its own. ...
  3. Get global leaders to convene.
3 Sept 2015

Is ice important to life? ›

Since water ice floats, it helps life survive on Earth. In the winter, when surface temperatures are low enough for water to freeze, floating ice forms a layer of insulation on top of lakes and seas. This ice layer insulates the water below it, allowing it to stay liquid, which allows the life within it to survive.

How can we help stop climate change in the Arctic? ›

Fast mitigation at scale can still slow future Arctic warming, starting with immediate cuts to the short-lived climate pollutants—black carbon, methane, tropospheric ozone, and hydrofluorocarbons. Cutting emissions of these short-lived pollutants immediately can reduce the rate of Arctic warming by up to two-thirds.

What cities will be underwater in 2050? ›

on the other hand, numerous and heavily populated sinking cities like mumbai, shanghai, nyc, and miami are at risk. 'with a population of 10 million, jakarta is considered by some to be the fastest-sinking city in the world and is projected to be entirely underwater by 2050.

Is there land under Antarctica? ›

There are few frontiers in the world that can still be said to be unexplored. One of these terra incognita is the land beneath Antarctica's ice sheets. Buried under kilometres of ice is a fascinating realm of canyons, waterways and lakes, which is only now being mapped in detail.

How much would oceans rise if all ice melted? ›

There is still some uncertainty about the full volume of glaciers and ice caps on Earth, but if all of them were to melt, global sea level would rise approximately 70 meters (approximately 230 feet), flooding every coastal city on the planet.

When did global warming start? ›

The instrumental temperature record shows the signal of rising temperatures emerged in the tropical ocean in about the 1950s. Today's study uses the extra information captured in the proxy record to trace the start of the warming back a full 120 years, to the 1830s.

What are the benefits of melting glaciers? ›

As glaciers melt, they add nutrients to the ocean and fertilize the local ecosystem. In Greenland and Antarctica, the ocean is short on iron, so melting glaciers make up for the lack of iron. Photosynthesizing phytoplankton are the base of the food web in the ocean and require lots of light and nutrients to grow.

Do glaciers give us water? ›

Melting glaciers can affect river runoff, and thus freshwater resources available to human communities, not only close to the glacier but also far from mountain areas. As glaciers shrink in response to a warmer climate, water is released from long-term glacial storage.

Why melting glaciers is a problem? ›

The Problem with Melting

Meltwater from the ice sheets and glaciers flows into the ocean, causing sea levels to rise. This can lead to flooding, habitat destruction, and other problems. Ice reflects the Sun's energy better than than land or water. So with less ice, Earth absorbs more energy, and heats up faster.

Why is the sea level rising? ›

Sea level rise is caused primarily by two factors related to global warming: the added water from melting ice sheets and glaciers, and the expansion of seawater as it warms. The first graph tracks the change in global sea level since 1993, as observed by satellites.

What are the social impacts of glaciers melting? ›

Glacial lake outburst floods will wash away people and infrastructure in the mountain slopes with more frequent floods (in the already fragile region) until around 2050, increasing river discharge. In the longer term, we will see persistent droughts with glacier-less mountains and water-less rivers.

Why is the Arctic sea ice disappearing? ›

The warming of the Atmosphere and the vertical heat fluxes from the Ocean are contributing to the Arctic sea ice rapid decline. A disappearance of Arctic sea ice in summer is predictable within 15 years.

Is Antarctic sea ice increasing or decreasing? ›

From the start of satellite observations in 1979 to 2014, total Antarctic sea ice increased by about 1 percent per decade. Whether the increase was a sign of meaningful change is uncertain because ice extents vary considerably from year to year around Antarctica.

Is the Arctic sea ice growing? ›

Claims circulating on social media saying that arctic sea ice is increasing and therefore climate change is not real present a misleading picture of the facts, experts consulted by Reuters said.

What will happen if Antarctica melts? ›

If all the ice covering Antarctica , Greenland, and in mountain glaciers around the world were to melt, sea level would rise about 70 meters (230 feet). The ocean would cover all the coastal cities. And land area would shrink significantly. But many cities, such as Denver, would survive.

How does melting sea ice affect humans? ›

The melting of this Arctic sea ice will most likely lead to further climate change. This is a problem because climate change affects almost everything important to humans, like plants, animals, the weather, and commerce. All these things, in turn, affect our food supplies.

What will happen if the ice caps melt? ›

There is still some uncertainty about the full volume of glaciers and ice caps on Earth, but if all of them were to melt, global sea level would rise approximately 70 meters (approximately 230 feet), flooding every coastal city on the planet.

Is the Arctic getting colder? ›

Both the Arctic (North Pole) and the Antarctic (South Pole) are cold because they don't get any direct sunlight. However, the South Pole is a lot colder than the North Pole.
...
Really cold, or really, really cold?
Time of yearAverage (mean) temperature
North PoleSouth Pole
Summer32° F (0° C)−18° F (−28.2° C)
1 more row

Where is ice increasing in the world? ›

The Arctic regularly reaches ever smaller extents of end-of-summer minimum extents of sea ice. This changing sea ice extent is cited by the IPCC as an indicator of a warming world. However, sea ice extent is growing in Antarctica [1]. In fact, it's recently broken a record for maximum extent.

When was the last time Antarctica was ice free? ›

Antarctica hasn't always been covered with ice – the continent lay over the south pole without freezing over for almost 100 million years. Then, about 34 million years ago, a dramatic shift in climate happened at the boundary between the Eocene and Oligocene epochs.

Is there land under Antarctica? ›

There are few frontiers in the world that can still be said to be unexplored. One of these terra incognita is the land beneath Antarctica's ice sheets. Buried under kilometres of ice is a fascinating realm of canyons, waterways and lakes, which is only now being mapped in detail.

How long will the Arctic ice last? ›

A new Nature Climate Change study predicts that summer sea ice floating on the surface of the Arctic Ocean could disappear entirely by 2035. Until relatively recently, scientists didn't think we would reach this point until 2050 at the earliest.

How long will Antarctica last? ›

In a 2016 study, a team showed that under the worst-case emissions scenario, nearly all the West Antarctic ice sheet could be lost within 500 years. By 2100 the region's melt could add an extra 2.5 feet to the world's oceans.

How can the Arctic be saved? ›

Reducing your carbon emissions and dependence on fossil fuels can help save the Arctic. Discover practical ways you can make a difference, from joining our campaigns to shopping greener at the supermarket and making your home energy efficient.

What cities will be underwater in 2050? ›

on the other hand, numerous and heavily populated sinking cities like mumbai, shanghai, nyc, and miami are at risk. 'with a population of 10 million, jakarta is considered by some to be the fastest-sinking city in the world and is projected to be entirely underwater by 2050.

What is forbidden in Antarctica? ›

However, in Antarctica, taking anything is banned. This includes rocks, feathers, bones, eggs and any kind of biological material including traces of soil. Taking anything man-made is also completely banned, as some might actually be research equipment.

What if Antarctica was green? ›

If Antarctica were to be green again and have a climate where plants could grow like they do in the temperate or tropical regions, it would need the ice cover to melt to clear the land Then it would need soil to form, which would take hundreds to thousands of years and then it would need temperatures to increase very ...

Videos

1. Arctic sea ice - What's the truth?
(Mallen Baker)
2. The Importance of Arctic Sea Ice
(Nature Bats Last)
3. Climate & Evolution: Charles Kennel - The Impacts of Arctic Sea Ice Retreat on Contemporary Climate.
(University of California Television (UCTV))
4. Why has NO New Record-Minimum Arctic Sea-Ice Extent occurred since September, 2012?? - Part 1 of 3
(Paul Beckwith)
5. When will Arctic Sea-Ice Vanish in the summer? 2023? 2025? 2032? What do you think?? Part 1 of 3
(Paul Beckwith)
6. Scientists measure how quickly crucial Antarctica glacier is melting
(PBS NewsHour)

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